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Wednesday, January 11, 2017

NY State Regents Discuss Overhauling The Teacher Certification Process


Regents discuss revamping New York state teacher certification requirements

New York may ease the burden on prospective educators by overhauling what critics contend is a difficult and costly teacher certification process.
On Tuesday, the Board of Regents discussed a set of recommendations proposed by a group of education officials and experts charged with evaluating the state’s current requirements. The state began to discuss strengthening certification exams in 2009 in an attempt to raise standards for those entering the teaching profession.
But some critics say those changes went too far and have become roadblocks, particularly for low-income aspiring teachers and those of color.
Prospective teachers in New York state have to clear four certification hurdles, demonstrating teaching skills, content knowledge and reading comprehension.
The proposed changes, which the policymaking body will likely vote on at a future meeting, include reviewing the passing score for the certification test, providing more vouchers to cover the exam’s cost, and possibly eliminating an exam that has produced significantly lower passing rates for black and Hispanic aspiring teachers.

Regents Chancellor Betty Rosa said the students who stand to benefit are often high-quality applicants faced with unfair testing constraints.
“These are students who have gotten very high scores … Their GREs [a graduate school entrance test] were through the roof,” Rosa said. “These were exceptional students and many of them students of color”
The state’s teachers union quickly praised the recommendations for maintaining rigor and eliminating unnecessary obstacles.
“The task force recommendations strike the right balance. If the Regents adopt them — and we urge them to do that — the new requirements will help to ensure that aspiring teachers know their subject area and how to teach it,” said NYSUT Vice President Catalina Fortino in a statement. “At the same time, it reduces some of the costs associated with these Pearson tests and eliminates an unnecessary and duplicative exam.”
The group called for state officials to potentially “recalibrate” the passing score on the edTPA, a test that requires prospective teachers to submit portfolios of work including lesson plans and a video of themselves teaching. And instead of relying entirely on test scores for those on the bubble, officials recommended considering additional factors like grade point average or a professor’s recommendation.
Part of the goal is likely to increase passing rates, since only 77 percent of aspiring teachers have passed the edTPA since its rollout in New York. Those who fail the test are still allowed to take the state’s previous exam, which reportedly yielded much higher pass rates.
Some Regents expressed concerns the changes could come across as lowered standards.
“We spent a lot of time talking about raising the bar,” said Regent Andrew Brown. “As I sat here and listened, it does sound like, at times, we’re talking about making it easier.”
But Regent Kathleen Cashin, who chairs the board’s committee on higher education, argued that revising the standards is fair since the exam is new and requires a slow, more deliberate rollout.
“Phasing in and implementation is wise,” she said. “It’s not weakening.”
The Regents discussed giving prospective teachers more time to prepare for assessments and to practice their craft. Currently, only 40 days inside a classroom are required.
“In medicine, if we had 40 days of internship we wouldn’t make very good doctors,” said Regent James Cottrell, who is a medical doctor.
The task force also recommended taking a hard look at — and possibly eliminating — another certification exam, known as the “Academic Literacy Skills Test,” while exploring other ways for teachers to demonstrate their literacy skills.
That exam, which tests things like writing and reading comprehension, has proven disproportionately difficult for aspiring teachers of color to pass. In the 2013-14, only 48 percent of prospective black teachers and 56 percent of prospective Hispanic teachers passed the exam, compared to 75 percent of prospective white teachers.
Both the Board of Regents and New York City have launched programs to increase the number of educators of color, particularly men of color, entering the teaching profession. Creating a test that discourages those students is antithetical to the state’s mission, Regents said.
“Diversity is not an option,” Regent Cashin said. “It’s essential.”
By Monica Disare         MDISARE@CHALKBEAT.ORG 


3 comments:

t M. said...

The union ok'd the edTPA? I find that rather odd. With the teacher shortage looming, you would think that they would want more teachers to fatten up those union dues. Speaking of which, Betsey can you write an article about the options that teachers have concerning paying union dues? I live in Rochester NY and our union does nothing to protect Special Ed teachers. I'd rather give my union dues to charity at this point.

Betsy Combier said...

The Beck Amendment - Get Your Union Refund
http://nycrubberroomreporter.blogspot.com/search?q=Paying+Union+Dues

t M. said...

Always helpful. Thanks.